How to puppy-proof your Christmas tree

With a real boom in puppy sales during the Coronavirus pandemic, many new pet parents are asking how to puppy-proof your tree.

As hundreds of families across the country prepare to face their first Christmas with a furry friend by their side, Josh Lyle from Pines and Needles shares his top tips to keep your Christmas tree – and your pooch – safe during the festivities.

1 Height – If you have a very young puppy or a very excited one, maybe consider getting a smaller tree and placing it on a side table instead of on the ground so that your pup can’t reach it. If you can’t bear to part with your bigger-ceiling topping tree, try and secure the tree to the wall using hooks that don’t leave wall marks so that no matter how much tugging puppy does, the tree will stand tall.

2 Location – It’s really important to think about where you’re placing your Christmas tree. Of course, you want it to be the pride of place, where you can enjoy it all festive season, but you also want it in a low traffic area to keep the tree and your decorations that little bit safer from inquisitive pooches.

3 Go bare at first – Before you decorate your Christmas tree, leave it up for a few days so that your pooch can get used to having a tree in the house. That way they’ll be less interested in it and more likely to leave it alone once it’s decorated and has lights and baubles hanging off it.

4 Electrical wires – You need to be super careful with any electrical wires leading form your tree to a plug socket, not only could your pup get tangled in them, but there’s also a risk of an electrical shock if they’re a chewer. Try hiding any wires or having them higher up if possible.

5 Ornaments – It goes without saying, any fragile ornaments or particularly sentimental ones, should go higher up on the tree so your dog doesn’t go for them. Not only will you lose your gorgeous decorations, but it could be a choking hazard or cause paw or mouth injuries.

For more information about trees on offer, please visit www.pineandneedles.com